Speed dating contracts

They spent most of the conversation explaining why they were content. Unfortunately, most of these people chose to mention this at the very end of the conversation. It’s the equivalent of attending an actual speed dating event and ending the conversation with “I’m happily married, I just came for the free beer”. I left so many of the conversations utterly confused. I marked a few developers with scores of 9’s and 10’s, but by the next day, I had no idea why. I gave one dev a 7 in the interview but reached out to him because of his resume. I would make it smaller and less wordy than my traditional resume. If you’re looking for a job or interested in switching I’d still recommend giving it a try.

Just like in real speed dating, you have to do something to stand out and be memorable. If I were to attend as a dev, I would be sure to bring something memorable for the interviewers to take with them. See if there is a city near you and request an invite.

Understandable, since this was a new experience for everyone in the room.

Take a minute to complain and 25% of the time I’ve known you, you’ve been full of negativity. I can’t imagine a situation where complaining about your job makes you look good. If I’m a candidate, I’m avoiding all opinions about my current employer, good or bad. If I’ve only got four minutes to convince someone I’m worthy, I’m focusing on personality and skill set. One of the most surprising things from the night was the number of developers that didn’t want a job. If I were attending as a dev who had no intention of joining another company… But if I had to I’d be sure to lead off the conversation with that. No time to write more than a word or two about each candidate and a quick little ranking. I would bring a fun overview of my skills and experience with a small profile picture. In my experience, it would have put candidates on another level.

For companies, the pitch is that each developer was hand picked by the event coordinators. Our event was for full-stack developers with 5 years experience. Here, first impressions aren’t just important, they’re everything. Why their company was wronging them and how much better they are than that. After all the pleasantries, you’ve got about 240 seconds to impress. But don’t spend precious time convincing me that you’re a victim. The fast-paced nature of the event means there is zero time for reflection.

While the rules may vary at different events, generally everyone gets a name tag, the women each sit down at a table, and the men rotate between tables every 8-10 minutes at the sound of a bell.

In that time, the “dates” have a chance to ask questions and strike a connection.

You could rely on blind dates set up by a friend, dating services online, or getting lucky at a bar or party.

Unfortunately, all of those options consume a lot of time and energy.

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