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Not sure why Internet Explorer cannot identify the applet as being harmless) Corrections in any of the material which follows, however tiny, would be most welcome. PETER AUSTIN (1) (1826-1846)PETER AUSTIN (2) (1846-1860? For simplicity, I will call them Peter Austin (1) & Peter Austin (2). In 1846 Peter Austin (1) retired and his son, Peter Austin (2) 'crossed to the site now occupied by the Company, where he conducted the business on his own account'. Which site was previously occupied by a bottle works which had gone bankrupt. I am most sympathetic with the difficult of assembling accurate data so far into the past. And 'Samuel Peter Austin' of the third generation & his father entered into a partnership in 1860 entitled S. The yard expanded eastwards into premises previously occupied by John Denniston (& William Pearson before him). So we know roughly the dating of the image that follows. Whidby her captain, thru 1869/70, but that clearly is not correct. Pegg, of London, initially for service ex Sunderland, soon London to China, & Liverpool to Singapore. were her new owners for service to Australia ex London & Liverpool. Austin, page bottom (have had to disable it, a beautiful Lake Applet featuring a frog, since it makes access to the whole page impossible. To search for specific text on this page, just press 'CTRL F' & then enter your search term. At a date after 1826, but at a date unstated, Peter Austin was joined in the business by his son, also named Peter Austin. It is interesting to read there that Robert Thompson, (1797-1860), also served his apprenticeship at the Allison yard. I presume, however, that they mean a site on the south bank of the River Wear, east of but close to the road bridge. I am advised, however, that 'The Standard' of London, referred on Nov. I think that the vessel was 'Choice' rather than 'The Choice' however. And that the company published a large series of stereo images of WW1, 'The Great War'. In 1856, per Turnbull's Register, & in Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 the vessel was owned by Thomas Wilson, & Wm. Now LR continues to record 'Wilson' as the vessel's owner & J. The vessel would seem to have traded initially to India & later to Japan. Nilsen' chosen to change the name of the vessel or had sold it. The vessel is not recorded in the 1882/83 edition, the next that I have, at least not as Thomas Wood, though it is quite possible that it was still listed there under another name had 'V. Per 1 (Board of Trade inquiry into the 1875 wreck, ex 'Accounts and Papers', published 1876, a 'Google' book).

A list of the Sunderland shipbuilders referenced in these pages is a little lower on page 040. This was on ground called Nova Scotia, near Dame Dolly's rock.' Brian Dodds states, however, that not only was the site called Nova Scotia, additionally the shipyard itself was called 'Nova Scotia' & was at Sand Point, near Dame Dolly's Rock, which rock was so named as it was the viewpoint from which Dame Dorothy Williamson and her maids would gather to watch ships sailing out to sea. I read that in 1874 they started a branch yard with G. Hunter, who later went across to the Tyne to start Swan Hunter's yard. Hunter, famous for his leadership role in what became Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., of Wallsend-on-Tyne. In 1890 they expanded into shipbuilding premises previously owned by John Hutchinson which included two small graving docks. I suspect, however, that he was Chairman in relatively recent years (by that I mean the 1940s or 1950s), though exactly when it was I do not presently know. A 'webmaster modified' version of the e Bay image is next, available in a slightly larger size here. Next is a simply splendid image of the pontoon & yard in Jun. An even larger version of the image is available by clicking the image. Marwood's North of England Register of 1854 still records the vessel as registered at Sunderland & owned by Thos. LR of 1874/75 thru 1876/77, records the vessel as owned by 'Bedlington', while LR of 1876/77 notes that the vessel had been 'Wrecked'. 5, 1876, Mora, then owned by 'Isaac Bedlington and others' & registered at WH, with Henry Beane ('Beane') in command, left Hartlepool with a cargo of 308 tons of coal for Flemsburg, (Flensburg, Germany, I believe), with a crew of 6 all told. 16, 1876, the vessel sighted Ohlenborg Light, but the light was only occasionally visible as the weather at the time was thick & the wind was blowing hard. it struck Puttgarden Reef (off Puttgarden, Germany & Femern island). Per 1 (data, Birch Grove - 1872), 2 (converted into a lighter in 1888), 3 (Sir John Grice, 'John Grice & Co.'), 4 (towed out to sea in 1932). The Austin 'pontoon' was located on the south bank of the River Wear, just east of the railway & road bridges. Part of the above text originates with a paper written by J. 138, 171, 203, 233, 263, 303, 324, 354, 384, 414, 420. Visible to all who crossed that bridge, since they just had to look down to see the pontoon & its activity laid out before them. There must be hundreds if not thousands of photos of the pontoon, 'out there' somewhere, taken by passers-by over 60 or more years. In a snippet of data, I read that the yard made a net profit of 51,900 in the year to Apl. And on this site, at page 140 is a list of 'Austin' built vessels, starting in 1831 & ending in 1959. A 2 masted sailing ship carrying square sails & a trysail on a small jackmast. And in 1874/75 Lloyd's Register, the owner is recorded as being G. 13, 1875, the vessel, under the command of Alexander Oppen & with a crew of 13 all told, left Demerera, (South America, now Guyana) bound for London with a general cargo.

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