Teen dating violence intervention

School-based studies in the past have found that nearly 9 percent of ninth through 12 graders experience physical dating violence, and 10 percent to 25 percent experience dating violence when including both physical and verbal aggression.It has also been found that these behaviors are often predictive of interpersonal violence in college and into adulthood.Further, many adolescents have difficulty recognizing physical and sexual abuse as such and may perceive controlling and jealous behaviors as signs of love (Levy, 1990).This article provides a critical review of the research literature with respect to risk factors for both perpetrators and victims of dating violence and examines the research on the effectiveness of prevention and intervention programs.There is considerable controversy regarding whether violence in teen dating relationships involves mutual aggression and indeed several studies report higher rates of inflicting violence for females (Foshee, 1996; Gray & Foshee, 1997; O'Keefe, 1997).Fundamental problems exist, however, in asserting gender parity regarding relationship violence.Moreover, the emotional consequences of the violence are more harmful for females than for males.Further research is needed to enhance our understanding of adolescent dating violence including the nature of conflicts, as well as the meaning, context, intent, and consequences of the violence and the role of gender.

The program also includes individual clinical counseling that provides young people with concrete tools to help them break the cycle of teen domestic violence and reduce its long-term harms.Teen dating violence appears to parallel violence in adult relationships in that it exists on a continuum ranging from verbal abuse to rape and murder (Sousa, 1999).Teen victims may be especially vulnerable due to their inexperience in dating relationships, their susceptibility to peer pressure and their reluctance to tell an adult about the abuse (Cohall, 1999).While teen dating violence prevention programs increased knowledge and changed student attitudes to be less supportive of such behavior, they did not actually reduce dating violence, according to this meta-analysis of research on middle- and high school intervention programs, report investigators.The researchers noted a small reduction in victimization (i.e., experiences of psychological abuse and sexual and nonsexual violence in dating relationships) following participating in a program, but it was not sustained over time For their analysis, researchers used the results of 23 rigorous studies on the short- and long-term impact of school-based interventions on student knowledge of teen dating violence, attitudes toward teen dating violence, and frequency of perpetration or victimization in adolescent intimate partner relationships.

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